Education News Feed - ValpoLife https://valpo.life Sat, 30 May 2020 11:07:53 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 Porterfield Family Chiropractic’s 4 Tips to Help Maintain a Healthy Weight https://valpo.life/article/porterfield-family-chiropractics-4-tips-to-help-maintain-a-healthy-weight/ Mon, 18 May 2020 19:56:02 +0000 Porterfield Family Chiropractic https://valpo.life/article/porterfield-family-chiropractics-4-tips-to-help-maintain-a-healthy-weight/ For many, maintaining a healthy weight is a major challenge. It can seem like no matter what you do, you can’t keep the weight off. If you are feeling frustrated by your weight, know that you are not alone. Excess weight is a problem for a large percentage of people in the US and increasingly across the globe. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to make maintaining a healthy weight easier.

4 Tips for Maintaining a Healthy Weight

1. Eat whole foods, mostly plants.

Probably the biggest advantage of eating whole foods – foods that have been minimally processed – is that you get a ton of great nutrition. But as far as weight gain goes, they have another major advantage. It’s difficult to consume enough of them to gain significant weight. You can’t fit enough in your stomach. An order of fries might contain 350 calories, whereas a plain baked potato might contain 150. How many baked potatoes can you eat at a sitting? And potatoes are actually pretty calorie-dense compared to other veggies. A cup of cooked broccoli only has 31 calories in it.

Animal-based foods are definitely more calorie-rich than plant foods, but you can still include them in your diet. Just try to balance your plate with more broccoli and less chicken.

If going whole foods seems daunting, don’t worry – you don’t have to immediately change your diet to enjoy weight loss. Take a slow and steady approach. Start adding whole foods to your meals. Let yourself get used to it and keep increasing the number of whole foods you are eating over the coming months. Eventually, your whole food consumption will squeeze out the processed foods and leave you slimmer over the long-term.

2. Exercise, but in a way that you enjoy.

You need to exercise to maintain a healthy weight and a healthy body. But there is a secret to exercise that you may not hear from all the businesses trying to sell you memberships, videos and training tools. The exercise you should do is the exercise you will stick with, which means you need to enjoy it! It should be fun to get out and get your exercise. Sure, it may be uncomfortable at first if you’ve been on the couch a few years, but keep going back at it and you will loosen up, get stronger and start having a lot of fun – which will keep you coming back for more. Did you love playing basketball in high school? Hit the court. Do you love gardening? Plan a gardening project and get started. You don’t need a gym membership or a treadmill if you won’t use them.

3. Get enough sleep.

It may seem weird to focus on sleep when we are talking about weight gain, but it’s important to mention. Without enough quality sleep, you are more likely to put on weight. You are more likely to make poor eating decisions, to avoid exercise and so on. You have to get enough sleep to live a healthy life.

4. Make lifestyle changes instead of dieting.

Maintaining a healthy weight requires healthy habits. Habits are actions that you don’t have to think about too much. You probably don’t have to wrestle with yourself to brush your teeth in the morning. You shouldn’t have to spend a lifetime wrestling with yourself to maintain your preferred weight. Diets and workout programs tend to be short-term solutions because they are so difficult to do. Yes, you can get faster results. But the vast majority of dieters will go back to their original weight in a relatively short period of time because the diets are too difficult to maintain.

Look for ways that you can slowly, steadily improve your health. And be compassionate with yourself. You don’t have to do it perfectly. You can slip up and try again. If you keep trying and take small enough steps, you can achieve a healthy weight and maintain that weight.

]]>
Porterfield Family Chiropractic’s 4 Tips to Help Maintain a Healthy Weight
Allergies or COVID-19? Get Help Deciphering Your Symptoms https://valpo.life/article/allergies-or-covid-19-get-help-deciphering-your-symptoms/ Sun, 17 May 2020 05:00:55 +0000 UnitedHealthcare https://valpo.life/article/allergies-or-covid-19-get-help-deciphering-your-symptoms/ As COVID-19 cases continue to spread across the country, experiencing a sneeze, cough or tickle in the throat may be more nerve-wracking. Before worry sets in, remember that spring is the time of year for seasonal allergies, which affect close to 50 million Americans each year.    

How do you determine if your symptoms are COVID-19 or allergies? To help you understand the difference, it may be best to look at the hallmark symptoms of each.

COVID-19 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO), COVID-19 is a viral respiratory illness and may spread through droplets released into the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. This is why federal and state guidance for social and physical distancing is recommended to help prevent the spread.

The CDC and WHO state the most common COVID-19 symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fatigue

Other symptoms may include:

  • Aches
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose
  • Sore throat 
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Loss of the sense of taste or smell.

The CDC says COVID-19 symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face

If you believe you have any of the COVID-19 symptoms listed here please contact your doctor or your local health department to find out whether you should be tested. Testing criteria is changing rapidly as more tests become available and as details of this illness are better understood.

Allergies

Allergies occur when a person’s immune system reacts to a foreign substance, such as pollen, pet dander or certain foods. While fever is a common symptom of COVID-19, it’s not often associated with allergies. The Cleveland Clinic notes if you don’t have a fever or trouble breathing, allergies are the more likely culprit, if you’re not feeling well. 

Allergy symptoms may include:

  • Itchy eyes
  • Itchy nose
  • Sneezing
  • Runny congested nose
  • Sore throat or cough associated with post-nasal drip

Allergies may linger for months in the spring season. If you feel symptomatic, the time of year may be a good indicator that you may have allergies. COVID-19 symptoms typically progress more rapidly over a shorter period of time, appearing 2 to 14 days after possible exposure. 

Another indicator that you may have allergies is if you are taking over-the-counter antihistamines or steroid nasal sprays to help your symptoms and those medicines help you feel better. There is no current evidence that shows allergy sufferers are at an increased risk of contracting COVID-19. 

For more information on the symptoms you may be experiencing, consider using the COVID-19 symptom checker for help in determining if you have COVID-19 symptoms. You can also learn more about your symptoms by contacting your doctor or health care provider.

For more COVID-19 resources, click here.

]]>
Allergies or COVID-19? Get Help Deciphering Your Symptoms
Indiana Region of the American Red Cross to Offer Virtual Emergency Preparedness ‘Pillowcase Project’ for Kids https://valpo.life/event/indiana-region-of-the-american-red-cross-to-offer-virtual-emergency-preparedness-pillowcase-project-for-kids/ Thu, 07 May 2020 14:12:51 +0000 American Red Cross https://valpo.life/event/indiana-region-of-the-american-red-cross-to-offer-virtual-emergency-preparedness-pillowcase-project-for-kids/ The Pillowcase Project, presented by Red Cross volunteers and staff, is open to all students grades 3-5.

The Indiana Region of the American Red Cross has adapted the American Red Cross Pillowcase Project—an emergency preparedness curriculum typically presented in classrooms, grades 3-5—to a virtual format, to ensure children continue to learn this critical information amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The program features interactive lessons focused on home fire prevention and safety and other potential hazards, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and earthquakes. Lessons are based on what might occur in the local community where the class is being taught.

On Thursday, May 21, 2020, 10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. EDT, Attend this presentation online.  Register here: https://redcross1.webex.com/redcross1/onstage/g.php?MTID=e20cfca542462497d38cd8ae9ad1a5eca.

]]>
Indiana Region of the American Red Cross to Offer Virtual Emergency Preparedness ‘Pillowcase Project’ for Kids
Brushing up on your child’s dental milestones https://valpo.life/article/brushing-up-on-your-childs-dental-milestones/ Mon, 16 Mar 2020 06:00:10 +0000 UnitedHealthcare https://valpo.life/article/brushing-up-on-your-childs-dental-milestones/ My heart sank a little bit as my 8-year-old son’s dentist pointed to a few hidden areas his toothbrush just wasn’t quite reaching. Then came the news we were hoping to avoid: two cavities.

I thought we followed all the rules with regular checkups and brushing twice a day. My kids were even getting the hang of flossing by themselves.

Still, I’ve realized proper dental health isn’t as easy as handing your kid a toothbrush. I needed to take a more active role in overseeing my children’s healthy brushing habits. In fact, an American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry “State of Little Teeth” report shows many parents may face the same struggles whether experiencing barriers, like a lack of access to pediatric dental care or just not understanding the steps needed to help set kids up for success.   

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry says nearly half of children aged 6-11 in the U.S. are affected by tooth decay, which is preventable. Other concerning statistics include: 

  • 1 in 10 2-year-olds already have one or more cavities.
  • By age 5, nearly 50% of children have one or more cavities
  • Vulnerable children living in poverty are twice as likely to experience tooth decay, which may impact eating, sleeping, self-esteem and school performance, AAPD reported in its annual research paper.

During February’s National Children’s Dental Health Month, these tips may reduce the risk of cavities and help make sure your child’s dental health is something to smile about. 

Babies (Birth to 1 year)

You can start good oral hygiene even at birth and keep the tiniest teeth healthy. Children with cavities in their baby teeth are more likely to get cavities in their permanent teeth. 

  • Starting at birth, clean your baby’s gums with water and a soft cloth or child-sized tooth brush.
  • Never put a baby to bed with a bottle of milk, formula, fruit juice or sweetened liquid. Sugar collects around their teeth while they are sleeping, resulting in decay. 
  • You can brush as soon as that first tooth appears. The Cleveland Clinic reports that developing the habit early may help your child have less resistance when it comes to brushing twice a day.
  • Schedule the first dental visit when the child’s first tooth comes in, usually between 6 months old to a year. 

Toddlers (1-3 years)

Until your little one has the skills to brush their teeth on their own, parents need to lead the charge.

  • Around age 2, parents can start brushing a baby’s teeth for two minutes, twice a day. A soft-bristled toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste is recommended.
  • The American Dental Association (ADA) also recommends a dab of toothpaste no larger than a grain of rice until age 3, making sure to teach the toddler to spit out the toothpaste, which may expose them to too much fluoride. 
  • After age 3, children can use a pea-size dab of toothpaste.
  • If your toddler isn’t cooperative, giving them something to play with can be a good distraction.

Children (4 years and up)

Most children have a full set of 20 baby teeth by the time they are 3 years old, according to the ADA.

  • Take your child to the dentist twice a year and ask about fluoride supplements, which help make the tooth enamel strong and fight decay. 
  • Begin flossing when back teeth begin to come in, usually around ages 3-4. Parents should actively floss at this age. Toothbrush bristles cannot reach between teeth.
  • Diet plays a key role in dental health. Limit sugary snacks and drinks between meals. 
  • Consider sealants on your child’s back teeth to protect them from decay when molars first come in. They are sometimes covered as a preventive service by dental plans, so check with your provider.

For children and adults, be sure to take advantage of your health plan’s preventive dental benefit (if available) and visit your dentist regularly. By taking these steps, you can start your children down the road of good oral health.

]]>
Brushing up on your child’s dental milestones
Community Healthcare System highlights heart health at Cardiovascular Research Symposium https://valpo.life/article/community-healthcare-system-highlights-heart-health-at-cardiovascular-research-symposium/ Mon, 09 Mar 2020 21:59:04 +0000 Curtis Hankins https://valpo.life/article/community-healthcare-system-highlights-heart-health-at-cardiovascular-research-symposium/ In 2019, more than 13 percent of Hoosiers age 65 or older were diagnosed with heart disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Community Healthcare System works with those Hoosiers every day and noticed that many are lacking critical knowledge about heart health and all of the medical resources available to them. In response, they organized an annual Cardiovascular Research Symposium which they hosted again this Wednesday.

“Heart disease impacts the body in so many ways, like causing strokes or sleep apnea,” said Tera Gagne, Cardiovascular Research Nurse Manager for Community Healthcare System and lead organizer of the symposium. “There are just so many things that can go wrong, the public needs more information. We have providers who can help.”

An array of Community Healthcare System professionals offered free screenings for various aspects of cardiovascular health, while other vendors offered information about essential services. Then, attendees gathered to hear presentations from four different doctors about a wide variety of topics.

“I’ve done a lot of events like this in the past and so many people just don’t understand their risk,” said Sarah Alexander, MD, a cardiologist for Community Healthcare System. “They don’t know that they have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes. Sometimes people don’t initially feel comfortable in a medical setting, but here it’s all public and you might come with family or friends. It helps people stay relaxed and comfortable while learning about their risk factors and what they need to act on.”

Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020

Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020 28 Photos
Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020

Alexander discussed how calcium scoring, a type of non-invasive CT scan, can be used to assess heart health. Interventional Cardiologists Dean Ferrera, DO, and David Stewart, MD, and Electrophysiologist Pratik Patel, MD, presented topics such as managing coronary artery disease, sleep apnea, and atrial fibrillation. Interventional Cardiologist Samer Abbas, MD, moderated the discussions.

“Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death both in the U.S. and worldwide,” Alexander said. “People often forget about that, but it’s on the rise, especially in younger women. We need to increase public understanding of their risk.”

Events like the symposium can even have a lifesaving impact in some cases.

“I saw a patient at another symposium we held in the fall, she was in atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat,” Gagne said. “She wasn’t taking any medication and she wasn’t seeing her doctor. I got her name, contacted her physician and we got her on medication. I actually saw her here today, she’s still taking her meds and keeping informed with her doctor. Stories like that are what make me happy.”

Attendance for this year’s symposium almost doubled from last year, packing The Center for Visual and Performing Arts to near capacity.

“We’re happy to be here and provide this resource,” said Karin Woodside, Community Outreach Specialist for Community Healthcare System. “We want people to have their questions answered and to learn what’s out there so that they can live happier, healthier lives.” To learn more about Community Healthcare System, visit www.COMHS.org.

]]>
Community Healthcare System highlights heart health at Cardiovascular Research Symposium
Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020 https://valpo.life/photo/community-healthcare-system-cardiovascular-symposium-2020/ Mon, 09 Mar 2020 21:55:37 +0000 Curtis Hankins https://valpo.life/photo/community-healthcare-system-cardiovascular-symposium-2020/ Community Healthcare System Cardiovascular Symposium 2020 St. Catherine Hospital Cancer Infusion Center Opening 2020 https://valpo.life/photo/st-catherine-hospital-cancer-infusion-center-opening-2020/ Thu, 05 Mar 2020 23:10:26 +0000 Kayla Belec https://valpo.life/photo/st-catherine-hospital-cancer-infusion-center-opening-2020/ St. Catherine Hospital Cancer Infusion Center Opening 2020 3 tips to help make the most of telemedicine https://valpo.life/article/3-tips-to-help-make-the-most-of-telemedicine/ Mon, 02 Mar 2020 07:00:15 +0000 UnitedHealthcare https://valpo.life/article/3-tips-to-help-make-the-most-of-telemedicine/ When a health issue arises, your first step may be deciding where to seek medical attention. Heading to an urgent care or the emergency room are often top of mind, but some people may forget telemedicine is often a viable option too. 

Telemedicine visits, also known as virtual visits, typically last less than 20 minutes, often cost around $50 and can connect you with a doctor 24/7, from the comfort of your home or while on the go. However, while nearly 40% of Americans* said they are interested in using telemedicine to access care, nationwide less than 10% do it. 

Virtual visits may provide convenient and more affordable care compared to other settings, while maintaining quality outcomes. In fact, when comparing virtual visits and office visits, about 63% of patients reported no difference in “the overall quality of the visit,” and virtual care was generally preferred for the convenience and avoidance of travel time. Plus, you may save up to $1,800 in comparison to the emergency room.

To help take advantage of this convenient technology, consider these three tips: 

  1. Identify available resources
    If you don’t know if you have access to virtual care, check with your hospital, health insurance plan or employer. Nearly 9 out of 10 employers are offering telemedicine to their employees. Medicare Advantage plans can offer coverage for telemedicine resources to access virtual care, in some cases at no out-of-pocket cost. 
  2. Understand appropriate ailments
    Telemedicine is most widely used to address minor and non-emergency medical conditions, including allergies, seasonal flu, pinkeye and rashes. If you experience a significant medical issue, you should go to the emergency room (ER), but 25% of ER visits typically involve conditions that could appropriately be address with a virtual visit.**

    Virtual visits are also emerging as a helpful resource for behavioral health services, making it more convenient and comfortable for people to access this type of care.
  3. Use your connected devices
    You can consider other technology to help access and potentially improve your health. These may range from smartwatches and activity trackers to continuous blood glucose monitors and technologically connected asthma inhalers. These devices may provide important real-time information and offer actionable feedback to a provider during a virtual visit.

Virtual visits may be ideal for treating minor and non-emergency medical issues, but it shouldn’t replace your relationship with a primary care physician for wellness check-ups and on-going care management. But if you’re hit with a bug or other minor medical issues, see if a virtual visit may work. Taking advantage of the convenience of telemedicine may help get you on the path to recovery even faster. 

*UnitedHealthcare Consumer Sentiment Survey of more than 1,000 Americans, 2019

**UnitedHealthcare data; Based on analysis of 2016 UnitedHealthcare ER claim volumes, where ER visits are low acuity and could be treated in a Virtual Visit, primary care physician or urgent/convenient care setting.

]]>
3 tips to help make the most of telemedicine
Porter Regional Hospital invites public to support groups in March 2020 https://valpo.life/article/porter-regional-hospital-invites-public-to-support-groups-in-march-2020/ Wed, 26 Feb 2020 20:41:33 +0000 Porter Regional Hospital https://valpo.life/article/porter-regional-hospital-invites-public-to-support-groups-in-march-2020/ Porter Regional Hospital is offering the following support groups in March. All support groups are free.

Our Carriage Infant Loss Support Group

Pregnancy and infant loss is an isolating, devastating experience. This support group is one of the few places where moms and grieving parents can speak the truth about the depth of their emotions and experiences, and also celebrate new milestones and breakthroughs during the grieving process. The group meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at Christ Lutheran Church, 2610 N. Campbell St., Valparaiso. The next meeting is March 19. Call 219-309-6116 with questions.

Breastfeeding Support Clinic

Please join other mothers who are breastfeeding to share experiences, ask questions and receive support.  A lactation consultant will be available to assist with any breastfeeding or latch issues, and we suggest bringing your infant in hungry so we can provide an infant weight check. The group meets from 3-5 p.m. on the first Thursday and third Tuesday of the month. The next meetings are March 5 and March 17, in the Women & Children’s Classroom at Porter Regional Hospital.  Complimentary valet parking is available. For more information call 219-983-8543.

Cancer Support Group
Porter Regional Hospital offers a support group for those affected by cancer to provide a safe and open environment to share your experiences and struggles, and connect you with local and national resources to aid during your time of need. The group meets on the first Wednesday of each month from 11 a.m. – noon and is open to anyone affected by cancer, including survivors, family members, friends and caregivers. This group meets at Pines Village, 3303 Pines Village Circle in Valparaiso.  The next meeting is March 4.  Registration is not necessary. For more information, call 219-983-6128.

Stroke Survivor Support Group
Porter Regional Hospital offers a support group for stroke survivors, their caregivers, family members, and loved ones. The monthly gathering offers an environment to share experiences and struggles, and connect with other survivors and local resources. The group meets on the last Thursday of the month from 2 to 3:30 p.m. The next meeting is March 26th in the Community Room at Porter Regional Hospital, 85 E. US Highway 6, Valparaiso. For more information, call 219-983-8355.

Women’s Cancer Support Group – Hope & Healing
Porter Regional Hospital offers Hope & Healing, a support group for women coping with cancer, whether newly diagnosed or a long-term survivor. The group offers emotional support, information, education, and guest speakers. It also provides the opportunity for individuals to share their unique concerns and feelings brought on by cancer. The Hope & Healing Support Group meets on the first Tuesday of the month from 5 – 6:30 p.m. at the Campbell Street Cafe, 4245 Meridian Woods Dr. in Valparaiso. The next meeting is March 3. For more information call 219-983-6128.

Traumatic Brain Injury Support Group

This support group offers encouragement for those with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).  The TBI Support group was started by Speech and Language Pathologists. The purpose of the group is for individuals who have experienced a TBI to meet others, share their experiences, and provide support in working toward various goals, promote participation in previous activities or returning to school/work. It is also a chance to just have fun and be social with others who understand TBI. The group meets from 11 a.m. to noon, the first Wednesday of every month at the Portage Outpatient Rehabilitation Center, 6040 Lute Road, Portage IN 46368. The next meeting is March 4. Family members are welcome.  Please call 219-764-1053 to RSVP.

Ostomy Support Group

This free monthly support group is open to anyone living with any type of Ostomy (Ileostomy, Urostomy, Colostomy, Koch Pouch, etc.) and their loved ones. Approximately 100,000 ostomy surgeries are performed annually in the United States. This support group offers ostomates monthly peer-to-peer emotional support, encouragement and education, and serves to encourage confidence, hope and promote ones independence and acceptance of living with an Ostomy.  People with ostomies live full & meaningful lives that include swimming, working, playing sports & having relationships.

Ostomy Group meets January – October 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM (4th THURSDAY of every month) at the Community Room (1st floor) at Porter Regional Hospital. October meeting is a celebration of National Ostomy Month.  For more information, call 219-983-8780 or Sarah Grcich 219-309-5939. Next meeting will be March 26, 2020.

Diabetes Support Group

This is a free support group for adults living with diabetes. The support group provides a place for team support including sharing ideas and experiences related to diabetes self-management. Most meetings have guest speakers including dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, and others to help address concerns and hot topics. Support group meetings are held Tuesdays from 5:30-6:30 pm in the Community Room at Porter Regional Hospital, 85 East US HWY 6, Valparaiso.  The next meeting is March 3. Call 219-263-7992 for details and to register.

###

Porter Health Care System includes Porter Regional Hospital, a referral center for Northwest Indiana. It also includes more than 20 outpatient sites located throughout the region. With more than 450 physicians representing 50 medical specialties, Porter Health Care System is committed to medical excellence and personalized patient-centered care. Porter Regional Hospital is owned in part by physicians.

]]>
Porter Regional Hospital invites public to support groups in March 2020
Porter Regional Hospital announces diabetes education opportunities for March 2020 https://valpo.life/article/porter-regional-hospital-announces-diabetes-education-opportunities-for-march-2020/ Wed, 26 Feb 2020 20:39:04 +0000 Porter Regional Hospital https://valpo.life/article/porter-regional-hospital-announces-diabetes-education-opportunities-for-march-2020/ Porter Regional Hospital offers a variety of diabetes education for the community. Classes are as follows:

Diabetes Self-Management Classes

This is a comprehensive program for individuals with diabetes to empower you to control your own health. A physician’s order and pre-registration are required.  Classes begin at the start of each month and continue for four weeks.  Classes are offered on a rotating basis monthly. Call 219-263-7992 for details and to register.

Individual Appointments

A physician’s order and pre-registration are required. Appointments may be made with either a certified diabetes educator or registered dietitian, depending on your treatment method and needs:  insulin administration, injectables, gestational diabetes, continuous glucose monitoring and nutritional education. Call 219-263-7992 for details.

Diabetes Support Group

This is a free support group for adults living with diabetes. The support group provides a place for team support including sharing ideas and experiences related to diabetes self-management. Most meetings have guest speakers including dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, and others to help address concerns and hot topics. Support group meetings are held Tuesdays from 5:30-6:30 pm in the Community Room at Porter Regional Hospital, 85 East US HWY 6, Valparaiso.  The next meeting is March 3. Call 219-263-7992 for more details.

Porter Health Care System includes Porter Regional Hospital, a referral center for Northwest Indiana. It also includes more than 20 outpatient sites located throughout the region. With more than 450 physicians representing 50 medical specialties, Porter Health Care System is committed to medical excellence and personalized patient-centered care. Porter Regional Hospital is owned in part by physicians.

]]>
Porter Regional Hospital announces diabetes education opportunities for March 2020